Modifying Electrical Load for additional lights

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mcsuehrstedt
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jun 12, 2019 9:25 pm
Vehicle: 2019 F350 Diesel

Modifying Electrical Load for additional lights

Post by mcsuehrstedt » Fri Jun 14, 2019 2:04 am

I have an F350 SRW CC LB Diesel. I have the LED package. I have added LED Running Board light and have tapped them into the Parking Light Circuit. If I run one running board, everything works great. When I add in the second, the parking lights, running board lights etc turn on for a second and then turn off. I am assuming the module is reading the higher load and turning off the circuit. Is there away to tell the truck computer that this load is okay.

Thanks,
Mark

jeff6146
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2018 2:11 pm
Vehicle: F350 dually lariat 2015 6.7L turbo 4X4
Location: West Texas

Re: Modifying Electrical Load for additional lights

Post by jeff6146 » Mon Jul 01, 2019 1:00 pm

Sounds like a mis wring issue. We’ve all done it from time to time.

Voltage drop is a very common LED installation issue and it all has to do with the layout of the wiring. If you are experiencing voltage drop it is most likely due to the fact that you have wired your LED installation in a serial connection rather than a parallel connection. Think of a parallel connection as each 10-20ft section of your LED lights running independently back to the power supply rather than linking them in a single series. Parallel connections will always give you the most even and consistent lighting output due to less voltage drop with less serial connections. See the illustrations at the bottom of this guide for a visual reference on the difference between the two types of connections.

Correct way: When installing larger LED installations or installations with a lot of wire running to multiple locations it is a must to wire your lights in parallel to the controller or power supply to reduce voltage drop. Think of a parallel connection as your LED lights running independently back to the power source, or run a home run wire to your power supply and splice into that wire at your different wiring locations. Test with a multimeter to check for voltage drop.

Incorrect way: For first time LED installers serial connections seem like common sense when wiring your LED lights. What people don't realize is that each little LED and it's components takes a bit of voltage away from the next in a series. So the longer you run your LED lights in a series the more voltage drop that is going to occur and the less even your lighting will be. If you are installing lights over 20ft or in multiple locations always use parallel connections.


Please see the 2 attachments for proper illustration of DO and DONT wiring examples.

Anyway, hope this helps.
Attachments
2233AEA8-8A0C-46DF-A212-571D9FDEDCC1.gif
DO NOT WIRE LEDS LIKE THIS
2233AEA8-8A0C-46DF-A212-571D9FDEDCC1.gif (4.22 KiB) Viewed 211 times
466BDEEC-B6F8-4567-831A-8EE00400CF3A.gif
DO wire leds like this.
466BDEEC-B6F8-4567-831A-8EE00400CF3A.gif (4.13 KiB) Viewed 211 times

jeff6146
Posts: 22
Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2018 2:11 pm
Vehicle: F350 dually lariat 2015 6.7L turbo 4X4
Location: West Texas

Re: Modifying Electrical Load for additional lights

Post by jeff6146 » Mon Jul 01, 2019 1:08 pm

Sounds like a mis wring issue. We’ve all done it from time to time.

Voltage drop is a very common LED installation issue and it all has to do with the layout of the wiring. If you are experiencing voltage drop it is most likely due to the fact that you have wired your LED installation in a serial connection rather than a parallel connection. Think of a parallel connection as each 10-20ft section of your LED lights running independently back to the power supply rather than linking them in a single series. Parallel connections will always give you the most even and consistent lighting output due to less voltage drop with less serial connections. See the illustrations at the bottom of this guide for a visual reference on the difference between the two types of connections.

Correct way: When installing larger LED installations or installations with a lot of wire running to multiple locations it is a must to wire your lights in parallel to the controller or power supply to reduce voltage drop. Think of a parallel connection as your LED lights running independently back to the power source, or run a home run wire to your power supply and splice into that wire at your different wiring locations. Test with a multimeter to check for voltage drop.

Incorrect way:
Please see the 2 attachments for proper illustration of DO and DONT wiring examples.
Attachments
20641BE6-22F9-4B57-8B0B-5893E29C82B4.gif
Don’t wire like this
20641BE6-22F9-4B57-8B0B-5893E29C82B4.gif (4.22 KiB) Viewed 211 times
1DCAA0C8-0D76-4826-A37C-CB05AE2BFB9F.gif
DO
1DCAA0C8-0D76-4826-A37C-CB05AE2BFB9F.gif (4.13 KiB) Viewed 211 times

Don Ridley
Posts: 77
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:31 am
Vehicle: 2016 Transit Connect

Re: Modifying Electrical Load for additional lights

Post by Don Ridley » Mon Jul 01, 2019 2:59 pm

You are correct, the parking lights have a current limiting circuit. I do not know how to override this. I doubt it is possible. You may have to use a relay and separate power source.

Don Ridley
Posts: 77
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2018 2:31 am
Vehicle: 2016 Transit Connect

Re: Modifying Electrical Load for additional lights

Post by Don Ridley » Mon Jul 01, 2019 3:35 pm

One option is to replace the existing parking light bulbs with LEDs. The lower current draw of the LEDs may allow the new load to operate on the parking light circuit. Look at the power requirements for all loads and calculate the draw for the various combinations of bulbs.

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